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I was served today with papers saying that I was being sued by Midland for a credit card that had been charged off by Credit One. Do I respond to this summons or is it a fake summons?

I'm afraid to call them because I know how mean they are and can barely speak English. Any help would be appreciated on what I should do. I do owe the debt but have not been able to pay it. Can I actually be sued and have to go to court?

This is stressing me out because if Credit One has charged off my debt, then how can this company try to get money from me. We are only talking about $750.

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

Product or Service Mentioned: Midland Credit Management Debt Collection.

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Anonymous
#1468851

Just don't give them any personal or financial information

evelkeeh
Titusville, Florida, United States #889904

My case was dismissed. When I went they don't even show.

I waited for 3 hours for the company to show and never did.

They never refiled the case either. So show up and wait and see is they come if not it will be dismissed.

Anonymous
Los Angeles, California, United States #875935

Chances are that the summons is real (I was just sued by Midland). If I were you, I would not contact Midland, I would use the summons information to contact the court (I did all this online) to verify that they did file a law suit against you.

They probably bought your debt from your credit card company (the charge-off is just accounting, they can still collect or sell the debt).

You have to respond if they filed against you or they will automatically win a default judgment.

Anonymous
to MichaelKuzak Cliffside Park, New Jersey, United States #942213

Ask for the master agreement via discovery. Ask for the amount they paid for it, along with the contractual data, including the last date a payment was made.

This could help with a SOL defense. Your answer needs to list admission or denial of each paragraph, separate defenses, and any counterclaims (see FDCPA) First separate defense: Failure to state a cliam upon which relief can be granted.

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